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07/14/2010

Comments

Jonathan

Thanks for the comment Ed! Your comment illustrates that while Osborn is known as the father of Brainstorming, it was only a small part of his contribution (287 pages of stuff before brainstorming!). He really democratized the notion of creativity; a radical notion at the time that everybody is and anybody can be more creative.

And thanks for sharing the last paragraph. Very profound, and certainly an inspiration for the work we do!

ed bernacki

Good piece - I was surprised when I first read Applied Imagination (1953 edition). I wanted to see the sentence where the concept of brain storming was introduced. I read and read and read. It was page 288. (I believe future editions reshaped the book.) I read 287 pages of tools to apply my imagination in more effective ways to solve problems. I learned that brain storming does not fail -- people can fail to brainstorm, however, if they do not learn to apply their imagination!
I also believe Osborn should be remembered for the closing paragraph. This is profound.
“We need new ideas to win wars. We need even more and better new ideas to win peace.”

Jean Bystedt

Thanks, Jon, for being the voice of so many of us who lead - pretty effectively, I might add - creative problem-solving sessions which include, but do not rely solely on brainstorming. Our process as outlined in the main Newsweek article consists of several important steps which have resulted in countless successful and important ideas for organizations around the world. We all (including Treffinger, but unfortunately not Newsweek) thank Alex Osborne and Sid Parnes for their invaluable contribution in the form of the Osborne-Parnes Creative Problem Solving model which gives us the roadmap for a deliberate way of thinking and working creatively.

Bill Hartwell

Thanks Jon...for your eloquent rebuttal to the poorly written 'Forget Brainstorming' side bar article. And I agree that the main article was pretty well done...although I would have liked to have seen the author site the real source and origin of the Treffinger CPS model!

Gregg Fraley

Thanks for writing this Jon. Twitter is all a-tweet with links to the Forget Brainstorming sidebar to the crisis article. I concur that the main article was well done.

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